September 1, 1747

1747 September 1 (Tuesday).  Rode to Boston with Brother Champney in order to go to Mr. Fletcher who had bought his place; and we were accordingly with him.  We din’d at Brother Samuel Parkmans.  A Sickly Time in Boston.  The Venerable Dr. Colman[1] dy’d Suddenly last Saturday.  Cousen Lydia Draper also is dead — her Funeral I attended this Evening.  Was with my Brother Alexander at Mr. Fletchers also, and I receiv’d of him 108£ 4 shillings old Tenor, being the remainder of what was due to my Children out of the two thirds of Father Champneys Estate.  N.B. We went also to Judge Sewalls.[2]  I lodg’d at Brother Alexanders.  N.B. Brother Champney led my Horse to Cambridge.

[1]The Reverend Benjamin Colman of the Brattle Street Church.

[2]Stephen Sewall, justice of the Superior Court of Judicature.

September 2, 1747

1747 September 2 (Wednesday).  Mr. Samuel Checkley[1] junior was ordain’d at old North.  Din’d with the multitude at Mr. John Brecks.  P.M. Dr. Colman was bury’d.  When such pillars fall, how the Whole Fabric Trembles!  Help Lord!  What threatening aspects!  A vast procession at the Funeral!  Twas observ’d that 66 Couple being the Males of the Church and the Colleague pastor in deep mourning before the Corps: Six senior pastors Pall Bearers with Hat bands down: 100 Couple of mourners and men — among the Latter, the Council, a great number of ministers — 4 Episcopal, among which Mr. Hooper[2] lately from England — 46 Couple of women.  4 Coaches in the first of which the Governor.  8 four wheel Chaises and 7 Common.  May the God of the Spirits of all Flesh grant double portions of His Spirit and quicken all surviving ministers to the work the Works etc.! [?] I supp’d at widow Jarvis’s with my Brother Alexander and his wife.  Lodg’d at sister Willards.  N.B. Cousen Nathaniel Parkman not well.  Gone to Nantucket.

[1](Harvard 1743).

[2]William Hooper was the minister of Trinity Church in Boston, 1747-1767.

September 3, 1747

1747 September 3 (Thursday).  Mr. Webb[1] preach’d the Public Lecture bewailing Dr. Colmans Death, from Rev. 1.18.  I din’d at Brother Alexander’s.  My Horse was Sent down to Mr. Proctors by Brother Champney.  Sarah Tyley lodg’d at Mrs. Keggells in order to be ready in the Morning to ride with me.  I lodg’d at Brother Alexanders who kept my Horse also.

[1]John Webb.

August 5, 1747

1747 September 5 (Saturday).  I devoted the forenoon as much as I could to Such recollections etc. as I have endeavour’d to employ this Day in — but was oblig’d to do what I could in preparing a Sermon for tomorrow.  See Natal. [The following appears in the Natalitia for the date of September 5, 1747.] I could not Spend the Day (being Saturday and when I had been at Boston in the week and so was not prepar’d for the Sabbath) as I Should have been glad to; but mindful in some measure of my Custom on this Day, but more I hope of the infinite Obligations I am under to the great God, who upholds my Soul, I gave myself as I could the fore part of it to recollections and Prayer.  And O that God most gracious and merciful would through the merits of Jesus Christ accept my (though scanty) Penitence, and my imperfect Devotions! O that God would kindle up in me holy affections, and enliven me in this way! Might I be in some fit manner sensible how certainly I must die, and how uncertain the Time when. May the Death of that eminent Man Dr. Colman, whose Funeral I have been this week attending on, rouse me to work the works of him that has Sent me while the Day of Life lasts, and to be ready when the Night shall overspread me! O that I might enter into new Resolutions and may the almighty Grace of God be sufficient for me to enable me to keep them!

September 9, 1747

1747 September 9 (Wednesday).  After Dinner Mr. Wellman went to Sutton.  He tells me that tomorrow is to be a fast with his people in order to gather a Church.  Mr. Campbell, Mr. Hall,[1] Mr. Webb,[2] and Mr. Maccarty are to assist in it.  At Eve Joseph Bowker brought me a Letter from Barrett which manifests some uneasiness on account of his coming to Mr. Graves t’other Day when I preach’d there.  I immediately wrote him an answer, and sent it by the same Hand.

[1]The Reverend David Hall of Sutton.

[2]The Reverend Nathan Webb of Uxbridge.

September 19, 1747

1747 September 19 (Saturday).  Ebenezer with the assistance of Nathan Maynard part of yesterday and part of to Day made six Barrells and Half of Cyder; of which Neighbour John Rogers had Two and Ebenezer boyled Two.  At Eve came Captain Ephraim Williams to see me — but would not lodge here but would go to his Cousen Mr. Samuel Williams and he accordingly lodg’d there. He tells me that Dr. Chauncy and Mr. Jackson of Boston parted at Eagers and would go to Marlborough and keep Sabbath there, against his Sollicitations to let him pilot them here.

September 20, 1747

1747 September 20 (Sunday).  On Mat. 24.25 and p.m. on Ezra 10.11.  At Evening I read to the Church a Letter from the Second Church in Sutton desiring our Assistance in their approaching Ordination.  Upon which our Church voted Compliance with their Request, and confirm’d it by asking whether any body objected?  But all being Silent, we then proceeded to appointment of the Delegates, and Two were offer’d to be the Number, and try’d by Vote; but there were So few voted, that I enquir’d what might be the Matter? Captain Warrin answer’d that seeing the Church had no Returns made ‘em of what was done when they sent out to Councils and such like, he did not know whether it was worthwhile to send any more.  I soon found by Ensign Bruce’s warm Speech (that follow’d as well as went before Captain Warrins) it was my not reading the Grafton Result that had given such Disgust.  I told ‘em That we had not the Custom with us, nor in the Churches where I had been concern’d that I know of, that when we had ever done it it was a special occasion for doing it; That indeed I had Some Reasons against Reading Results abroad round the Country, to Spread at great Distance (it would be some times) the miscarriages of Christians and Ministers etc.  But yet I was free and ready to gratifie ‘em in the present Case; either any my own House or otherwise when desir’d and was sorry they would make Such a Difficulty as that to clogg the present Duty (or to that purpose).  Lieutenant Forbush said a man had told me that he ask’d me to read it — but that I did not.  I reply’d that I had not a Copy at first, when I came Back from that Council — and that afterwards it seem’d late to read a Result; and I did not know there was any uneasiness about it, and could not take it well that the first Discovery of uneasiness Should be in such a public manner as this.  Captain Baker mov’d that being it was the sabbath it might be better to defer it to some other Time.  Lieutenant Tainter said he saw not why the Business might not go on, for this was a different work from that of going to Councils upon Differences etc.  But twas urg’d that we should be together again at the Thursday ensuing, and we had best wave anything further about it till then.  So it was deferr’d accordingly to that Day (the Day of the Lecture).  But note well, that when Brother Stephen Fay and Brother Daniel Hardy said they believ’d there was not a Vote, it made me recurr from that to the first vote (of granting the request of the Letter), and observ’d to them that I esteem’d that vote to have been pass’d, for I had put it both ways, and desir’d if there was objection it might be shown.  But at this Time there was no Objection made against that Vote.  I look upon that therefore as doubly confirm’d.  When I came home Captain Ephraim Williams was at my House and tarry’d with us over night.  About nine o’Clock there was a storm of Thunder and Lightning But the Lord preserv’d us in safety.

September 21, 1747

1747 September 20 (Sunday).  On Mat. 24.25 and p.m. on Ezra 10.11.  At Evening I read to the Church a Letter from the Second Church in Sutton desiring our Assistance in their approaching Ordination.  Upon which our Church voted Compliance with their Request, and confirm’d it by asking whether any body objected? But all being Silent, we then proceeded to appointment of the Delegates, and Two were offer’d to be the Number, and try’d by Vote; but there were So few voted, that I enquir’d what might be the Matter? Captain Warrin answer’d that seeing the Church had no Returns made ‘em of what was done when they sent out to Councils and such like, he did not know whether it was worthwhile to send any more.  I soon found by Ensign Bruce’s warm Speech (that follow’d as well as went before Captain Warrins) it was my not reading the Grafton Result that had given such Disgust. I told ‘em That we had not the Custom with us, nor in the Churches where I had been concern’d that I know of, that when we had ever done it it was a special occasion for doing it; That indeed I had Some Reasons against Reading Results abroad round the Country, to Spread at great Distance (it would be some times) the miscarriages of Christians and Ministers etc.  But yet I was free and ready to gratifie ‘em in the present Case; either any my own House or otherwise when desir’d and was sorry they would make Such a Difficulty as that to clogg the present Duty (or to that purpose). Lieutenant Forbush said a man had told me that he ask’d me to read it — but that I did not. I reply’d that I had not a Copy at first, when I came Back from that Council — and that afterwards it seem’d late to read a Result; and I did not know there was any uneasiness about it, and could not take it well that the first Discovery of uneasiness Should be in such a public manner as this.  Captain Baker mov’d that being it was the sabbath it might be better to defer it to some other Time. Lieutenant Tainter said he saw not why the Business might not go on, for this was a different work from that of going to Councils upon Differences etc. But twas urg’d that we should be together again at the Thursday ensuing, and we had best wave anything further about it till then. So it was deferr’d accordingly to that Day (the Day of the Lecture). But note well, that when Brother Stephen Fay and Brother Daniel Hardy said they believ’d there was not a Vote, it made me recurr from that to the first vote (of granting the request of the Letter), and observ’d to them that I esteem’d that vote to have been pass’d, for I had put it both ways, and desir’d if there was objection it might be shown.  But at this Time there was no Objection made against that Vote. I look upon that therefore as doubly confirm’d. When I came home Captain Ephraim Williams was at my House and tarry’d with us over night. About nine o’Clock there was a storm of Thunder and Lightning But the Lord preserv’d us in safety.

September 27, 1747

1747 September 27 (Sunday).  Sacrament.  Preach’d on Mat. 13.51, a.m.  On Jer. 8.4.5.  Deacon Fay, old Mr. Bellows,[1] and Mr. Cutter of Brookfield and Mrs. Deliverance Fay[2] din’d here.  At Evening had Some more peculiar Meditations and Resolutions respecting a Closer Walk with God and self Reflection — but alas! how weak and slender is all that I can do! Read at night Sir Matthew Hales Discourse on Religion[3] and Letters to his Children.[4]

[1]Eleazer Bellows.

[2]Daughter of Samuel Fay, Jr.

[3]Matthew Hale, The Judgment of the late Lord Chief Justice Sir M. H. of the Nature of True Religion (London, 1684).

[4]Matthew Hale, A Letter from Sir Matthew Hale . . . to his Children (London, 1684).

September 28, 1747

1747 September 28 (Monday).  Visited old Mr. Fay. Was at Mr. Whipples, Lieutenant Tainter, at Mr. Jonah Warrin’s and at Mr. Williams’s.  N.B. at this last House (Mr. Ebenezer Nurse being by) we had some Discourse concerning the vast alteration of the Price of all sorts of Things, and the great Distress it reduces Ministers in a peculiar manner to: But twas plain that Mr. Williams was disquieted with it and did not love to hear of it; whereas considering the Evidence and  palpable Injustice done me in particular by the Precincts Delay to consider my Case, it is an aggravation of the Evil, that it can’t be mention’d without giving Disgust. May God give me Wisdom and Patience, and Fidelity!

September 29, 1747

1747 September 29 (Tuesday).  I walk’d down to Mr. Cooks and there wrote a Letter to my Daughter Molly at Cambridge and sent it with 12£ of money by Eli Forbush.  A number of Hands came and gather’d my Corn. Mr. Samuel Fay junior, Joseph Green junior, Edwards Whipple (who was a first mover) and p.m. John Chamberlin, John Rogers, Benjamin Tainter, Joseph Bowker.  Had Mr. Tinneys Cart as well as my own. P.M. visited Stephen Maynard. N.B. Dr. Greenleaf there to see him. At Evening husk’d. I know not of more than a small Number, and we provided accordingly, but there came (as I think they were counted) 34.  Yet God was pleas’d to bless out Provision and he[?] had Considerable left. N.B. they finish’d at 10 o’Clock. Sang latter part of Ps. 4 in Tate and Brady. Through the Bounty of Providence a good Crop.