January 1, 1751

1751 January 1 (Tuesday).  Every Year brings fresh occasion of Praise to the great, unchangeable, and incomprehensible Being who upholds the Universe!  Let me especially praise and adore Him who preserves my Soul and Sustains my Body; who confers richest Favours on the vilest Ingrate!

 

To Thee Supreme, Omnipotent!

May universal Nature rise!

“Homage To thee, with one Consent,

From whom we all have all Supplys!”

But thou, My Soul, as thou’rt most bound,

Thy Breath and Being chearfull Spend.

The Great Jehovah’s Praise resound

To Ages that shall never End!

 

At Eve my wife and I rode over to Mr. Francis Whipples and assisted at the Solemnizing the Marriage of his Daughter Lucy to Nathan Maynard.[1]  N.B. She was born this Day 22 Years Since.  An handsome supper, and though a Cold Night, yet it was (through the Smile of Providence) a pleasant, joyfull Time.  As I would bemoan my Ingratitude, Barrenness, Senselessness, So I would beg of God to quicken, pardon and help me!  To God I would committ all the Events of this Year!  But!  I know not what a Day may bring forth!

[1]The son of David Maynard.

January 2, 1751

1751 January 2 (Wednesday).  Cold, raw Day.  The Earth open still and good Clearing.  Ebenezer and Thomas improve it.  I was much employ’d with Ramsays Cyrus and (except yesterday) for Several Days.  It shews a Strong, bright Genius, and is writ with much Elegance.  Old Mr. Maynard came to invite me, and my wife also to his House at Even, his Son Nathan having brought home his Bride.  We went and Supp’d with them.

January 5, 1751

1751 January 5 (Saturday).  Read a Letter from Mr. Elijah Collins concerning my Watch, and from my Brother Parkman[1] concerning his Marriage last July 19 to Captain Harris’s Widow, his near Neighbour, and took her to his House the 31.  That her Son, William Harris’s Brigantine was lately ashore on Plumb-Island, where his Father was cast away, and lost a Brigantine which my Brother was part owner of.[2]

[1]William or “Elder” Parkman of Boston married Hannah Harris.

[2]The Boston Gazette, or Weekly Journal, Dec. 4, 1750, reported “One Day last Week, a Brigantine deep laden from the West Indies, in bad Weather, ran ashore on Plumb-Island, and tis feared will suffer much Damage.”

January 6, 1751

1751 January 6 (Sunday).  I rode over to Mr. Martyns and he came hither.  He read not publicly either a or p.m.  His Texts Dan. 2.21, and Mat. 6.33.  He return’d home at Eve.  I at his meeting read a.m. Lev. 25, and preach’d on Jer. 6.8.  P.M. read Acts 2 and preach’d on Numb. 23.10.  At Eve I was very much tir’d, and it being very dark when I had refresh’d my Self at Supper with Mr. Martyn, I tarried and lodg’d there.  I had design’d also to go to Bolton next Morning.

January 7, 1751

1751 January 7 (Monday).  It prov’d a very Stormy Morning — it blew and Snow’d and became very tempestuous.  I yielded to their Importunity to Stay till noon.  After Dinner I ventur’d out, and got home safely — my Family also in Comfort.  But Captain Maynard came towards Eve, and had a fresh Debate about the precincts pulling down the old Meeting House.

January 9, 1751

1751 January 9 (Wednesday).  Mr. Whitney here — reckon’d with him for his work, about my New House — gave him a Note to Lieutenant Tainter for 5 Days — 2 at framing and 3 at digging Stones — 15/ per Day — in all £3.15.0 old Tenor.  Thomas making another New Pillion.  Ebenezer sledded Wood.  I kept to my Preparations with some Diligence.

January 10, 1751

1751 January 10 (Thursday).  My Wife and I design’d to have rid to Marlborough, but a young Dog antickly Seiz’d upon the Lining of the Chair (which was to be set upon Runners) and tore it wholly out of the Back: which exceedingly defac’d it.  However we rode over to the widow Newtons[1] and din’d there.  Captain Eager[2] there also.  At Eve my son Thomas rode over to Robert Cooks — I thought upon Business, but (as I came to understand afterwards) to an House-warming.

[1]The widow of Ensign Thomas Newton.

[2]James Eager of the north precinct.

January 13, 1751

1751 January 13 (Sunday).  Very Rainy.  The Rain with the Snow upon the Earth make it very difficult going to Meeting.  A few of us arrive there.  A.M. read several parts of Lev. 13, Scil. the heads of the paragraphs and gave Some Expository Observations.  Preach’d a. and p.m. on 2 Sam. 33.3.  So very rainy at Noon that I acquainted the Congregation that I Should not go out of the Meeting House, and desir’d them that went out to come in again, in 1/4 of an Hour.  I eat a bit of Bread and Cheese which my Maid handed to me in the Pulpit, and I was much refresh’d.  P.M. according to my proposal to the Congregation I went not out of the House, but began the Second Service as soon as the people gather’d in.  Read Acts 4, and gave Some glances upon it.  Preach’d as aforesaid.  Got home safely though it was very tedious to me.  However I bless God for my many Comforts which I am favour’d with!  After Supper and the Evening Exercise in my Family I read to them Mr. Baxters Preface to his Call.  May God grant His Awakening Spirit to accompany it and render it profitable!

January 17, 1751

1751 January 17 (Thursday).  According to appointment I met Mr. Stephen Fay at Justice Bakers Though it was rainy Weather and bad Stirring abroad.  I din’d at Deacon Newtons.  I went down with Justice Baker and Mr. Stephen Fay to look of the Land within my Plot of 4 acres and 57 Rods.  Mr. Fay and I agreed to go on and give each other a Deed; I him of 3 Acres and 37 Rods of this Land, and he me of Three Acres Right of the sixth Division, to take up Common Land other where.  We finish’d the Affair at Mr. Ebenezer Rice’s.  N.B. Mr. Rice’s Young Man (Dudley) and his wife’s brethren, had been at the Great Pond, though foul Weather: and caught a great Number of fine Fish — the Pickerell, Some of them very large.  They made me an handsome Present of 3 large ones.  At Deacon Newtons as I return’d home, but tarried not long.  N.B. Ebenezer at Mr. Cornelius Cooks[1] assisting him in making a stubb scythe, a Whipple-Tree Chain and several other Things.

[1]Westborough’s blacksmith.

January 18, 1751

1751 January 17 (Thursday).  According to appointment I met Mr. Stephen Fay at Justice Bakers Though it was rainy Weather and bad Stirring abroad.  I din’d at Deacon Newtons.  I went down with Justice Baker and Mr. Stephen Fay to look of the Land within my Plot of 4 acres and 57 Rods.  Mr. Fay and I agreed to go on and give each other a Deed; I him of 3 Acres and 37 Rods of this Land, and he me of Three Acres Right of the sixth Division, to take up Common Land other where.  We finish’d the Affair at Mr. Ebenezer Rice’s.  N.B. Mr. Rice’s Young Man (Dudley) and his wife’s brethren, had been at the Great Pond, though foul Weather: and caught a great Number of fine Fish — the Pickerell, Some of them very large.  They made me an handsome Present of 3 large ones.  At Deacon Newtons as I return’d home, but tarried not long.  N.B. Ebenezer at Mr. Cornelius Cooks[1] assisting him in making a stubb scythe, a Whipple-Tree Chain and several other Things.

[1]Westborough’s blacksmith.

January 20, 1751

1751 January 20 (Sunday).  A pleasant Day.  I read Lev. 14 to number 32 with long Expositions.  Preach’d on Tit. 3.1.  Din’d at Justice Bakers — my wife and several of the Family tarried at the Meeting house — Billy din’d at Mr. Ebenezer Rice’s.  P.M. read Acts 5, with some brief Exposition.  Not having altogether finish’d my Preparations for the Afternoon Exercise, though I began early in the Week and continu’d more than usual at the work, yet by Reading Dr. Hoadly[1] etc., and my meditations enlarging, yet being desirous it might not be more than Two Exercises; I wanted also some more moving Subject for the afternoon — I therefore repeated to page 8 of sermon on 1 John 2.14, latter part.

[1]Bishop Benjamin Hoadly (1676-1761) was a controversial figure who published numerous works.

January 21, 1751

1751 January 21 (Monday).  Daniel How assisted Ebenezer and Thomas in Killing Two large Hoggs.  Each 12 Score, 11 3/4.  P.M. my sons thrash’d Wheat and Swingled some small matter of Flax.  Mr. Phinehas Hardy, afterwards Mr. Samuel Hardy, Mr. Grow and Mr. Harrington, were here, reckon’d with them for work and Stuff about the New House and gave each of them a Note to Lieutenant Tainter.  Captain Maynards Wife made us a Visit.  At Eve I rode over to Mr. Williams and receiv’d £9.10 old Tenor of money from him.  The forepart of this Day was exceeding pleasant.

January 22, 1751

1751 January 22 (Tuesday).  The early Morn began with Storm.  As the Day got up it grew exceeding Tempestuous.  The Wind at South, very Stiff, and sometimes like meer Hurricanes, raining very hard also.  It beats extremely against, and into the House.  The Lord hath his way in the Whirlwind and in the Storm, and the Clouds are the Dust of his Feet.  Nah. 1.3.  Stormy Wind, fulfilling his Word.  Ps. 148.8.  Storm prevails till The Middle of the Day: then the Clouds Scatter and the Sun appears; yet it continues very windy.  In the Storm, Two Apple Trees (which were defective) were blown down; the Roof of the Bee House was blown off.  The Well-Crotch, Sweep and Pole were laid flatt, one Leaf of the front Gate was forc’d from the Post and thrown down; and it was wonderful that the Roof of the Barn was not carry’d off and destroy’d.  The Rain beat through the Windows of the House so much that there were great Puddles in the Rooms and Chambers, but especially in the Great Entry; and had the Wind and Rain continued with Such Violence for a little while longer, it look’d as if the sashes of the Windows would have been forc’d down and the House laid open that we could have had little or no Comfort.  But Blessed be God who in the middst of Wrath remember’d Mercy!  He that raised the Stormy Wind, made it obey and fulfill his Word.  We have reason to fear there is much Dammage done by this terrible Storm.  I hear already of the Desolation of Mr. Daniel Forbush’s Barn which was blown down to Day when the Cattle were in it, and he himself gone to Boston.

January 23, 1751

1751 January 23 (Wednesday).  A.M. Ebenezer and Thomas got Wood.  P.M. they went into the Woods to prepare Loggs for the Saw-Mill.  Mr. Charles Rice with me and reckon’d.  N.B. a Letter from Mr. Henry Goold[1] of Concord for Money.  At Eve Mr. Stephen Sadler[2] and his wife and they lodg’d here; as did Master Forbush also; there being an Entertainment or Frolick, of some young people at his Lodgings (Captain Maynards) to Night.

[1]Parkman’s son had been apprenticed to Gould.

[2]Of Upton.

January 24, 1751

1751 January 24 (Thursday).  Moses Warrin[1] was married to Persis Rice, Daughter of Mr. Seth Rice.  Some of the Company (without any Knowledge) took in the Key which offended a Number of persons who came to see ‘em married, and particularly Jonathan Smith was so much displeas’d that he got an Horn, and when the Bridegroom with his Bride and attendants were returning home, he began to blow, even before they had got all of them away from the Road before my Gate.  I therefore went out and Smartly reprov’d him for his Impudence and Folly.  P.M. my wife and I, though it was very cold, took a Ride to See old Mr. Fay in his illness and confinement.  We also went to Benjamin Fay, and examin’d into their suffering Young people to have a Frolick a little while ago at their house.  At Eve we were at Mr. Nathaniel Whitneys and we made a Visit also to Mr. Daniel Forbush, where I saw Some of the Sorrowful Effects of the late storm, which blew over his Barn.

[1]The son of Daniel Warrin of Westborough.

January 30, 1751

1751 January 30 (Wednesday).  My wife and I rode to Marlborough — as we went we call’d at Deacon Rice’s[1] and din’d there.  Renew’d my Desire to Jeduthan Baldwin to work for me in finishing my New House.  We visited Dr. Gott who is in a waste and much confin’d.  We went also to see Cousen Sally Brigham at Justice Brighams.[2]  I was likewise at Mr. Smiths[3] and Supp’d there with one Mr. Osgood of Andover.  N.B. Judge Dudley[4] lies dead.  Captain Boardman bury’d this Day.  We lodg’d at Dr. Gotts.

[1]Caleb Rice of Marlborough.

[2]Charles Brigham, a justice of the peace.

[3]The Reverend Aaron Smith of Marlborough.

[4]Justice Paul Dudley of the Superior Court of Judicature died Jan. 21, 1751.

January 31, 1751

1751 January 31 (Thursday).  A very Snowy forenoon.  I went to Mr. Benjamin Woods[1] but returned and din’d at the Doctors.  I wish I could deal more plainly with the Doctor about his intemperate use of Spirituous Liquors — yet had it over and over with him and gave him what Charge I could that he should abstain — but I fear it is all in Vain.  Mrs. Rachel Bowker there.  Everyones Heart bleeds — but we must leave it to God!  P.M. we visited at Mr. Smiths (Mr. Osgood not gone) and went in to See Mrs. Williams to mourn with her under the loss of her Father.  At home in the Evening.

[1]A leading citizen of Marlborough.